4k HDR Rec2020

With all the fuss about the new 4K HDR TVs on the market, Nature Relaxation owner David Huting wanted to take a few moments to clarify just what HDR is, how it works in photography and in video & TV playback, and why Nature Relaxation videos are perfect for any 4K HDR TV. [Read Time: 5 Minutes]

About High Dynamic Range

Dynamic (v) Range (n) = a diverse spectrum

General Overview of what makes HDR

Dynamic Range when referred to in video and photography is describing the range of light captured by the camera. As a general rule, the human eye has a much wider dynamic range than almost any camera, which is why it is easy for us to see both darks and lights simultaneously. Because most consumer and semi-pro cameras operate on a sensor that is much less than the full frame 35mm size, they capture far less light and color information than the human eye can see. The result: videos and images that are dark or too bright in certain areas, and therefore not perfect.

HDR for Photography

HDR in photography typically involves capturing multiple images from the same angle, but with different exposure and shutter speed settings, which are then blended together either automatically using software like Adobe Bridge, Lightroom, etc or Manually using Photoshop or other image editing software.  By selectively taking the correctly exposed areas out of each image and blending them together, the effect creates an image more similar to how the eye would see it - and in some cases even more dynamic! This explains the popularity of HDR - it enhances overall dynamic range thus creating a more complete and captivating image.

HDR for Video and TV Playback

Thanks to the continuously advancing sensor technology in digital video pushing 4K and beyond, new cameras and color profiles are emerging to harness the true potential of the newest TV display technology, called 4K HDR.  At a very basic level, this means that the TV is now able to project a more diverse array of color and light information. When paired with HDR video, it makes for a viewing experience that is like none other. Currently, 4K HDR TVs are available from multiple sellers and the average price for a 65" is roughly $2k.


This refers to a new type of color profile, (which I am currently learning a bit more about) called Rec2020. It carries a much higher dynamic range of color information (light) than traditional RGB or any previous technology. While not currently available in the REC2020 profile, Nature Relaxation videos are still technically HDR and available in uncompressed, beautiful Pro Res 422HQ files which can likely soon be converted to REC2020. More info on this soon as I have it!

Why Nature Relaxation Videos are 4K HDR 

Technically: yes. Why? The camera I use to film on is the Canon 1-DC which is a top-of-the-line full frame cinematic camera specifically designed by Canon to provide an unprecedented level of color information and control along with their first-ever support of 4K video resolution. What that means is when I am editing the video, I can specifically bring out more of a dynamic range of colors in my shadowy dark areas and bright and slightly over-exposed areas. The results? Well, watch any 4K Nature Relaxation video on a 4K HDR TV and you will see just for yourself what I mean!
From a REC2020 standpoint, however, Nature Relaxation videos are technically not 4K HDR. (I am awaiting on a response from Adobe regarding Premiere Pro CC support of rendering in this new color profile but have not heard back.)

 Hope this information helps and please comment with any questions! Be sure and check out my free 4K downloads to test out a 4K file or submit a license request if you want to try some ProRes 422 Uncompressed videos!